Participant Group: Young and adult prisoners

Meet Heather

inside stories 2019
inside stories 2019

MEET HEATHER

Heather talks about her personal experiences with our prison work

Inside Stories is Create’s multi-award-winning programme with fathers in prison. It gives them the opportunity to work collaboratively to produce original, illustrated stories and music for their children, which they perform. Their children then receive a storybook and CD to enjoy at home.

Heather, whose six-year-old daughter Kyra’s father took part in Inside Stories, reveals the impact the project has had.

“My daughter Kyra’s father Sam, who is in prison, has dyslexia and special educational needs. There was barely any help available when he was a child. I’m a primary school teacher and encouraged Sam to enrol in adult education a few years ago to help him get a job. On the first day, another student made fun of him because of the stutter he has when under pressure – another thing he hasn’t had help with. He refused to return, and has never been able to find a job due to his poor literacy skills and reluctance to participate in any education as he does not like to look ‘silly’.

“Kyra misses her father greatly. He always used to tell her stories at bedtime, and words cannot describe how much having this story written by her father and being able to hear his voice has helped.”

Heather

“Sam was initially reluctant to take part in Inside Stories because he cannot read or write, and always hated school. But when he spoke to me on the phone after his first workshop, I could tell he was surprised because he’d really enjoyed the session. He began to look forward to the sessions and always wanted to talk to me about them.

The day of the performance

“Kyra and I attended a performance of Sam’s story at the prison. Friendly staff took us to the prison chapel, which was filled with musical instruments, and we waited for the children’s fathers to arrive.

“Sam played the xylophone during the performance of his story, an adventure about a magical unicorn. I was completely stunned at what he had managed to achieve, and couldn’t believe he was brave enough to be in front of a small group performing music for a story for his daughter. I struggled not to cry!

“Kyra was engaged for the whole session and had a wonderful time. She also got the chance to play musical instruments and create a collage after the performance. She misses her father greatly. He always used to tell her stories at bedtime, and words cannot describe how much having this story written by her father and being able to hear his voice has helped. Inside Stories is an excellent idea for fathers in prison. It brings families together.

“It’s wonderful that Create has managed to change Sam’s opinion on education and that he enjoyed the workshops. I hope there will be more opportunities available for him as I feel it will quite possibly change his outlook on life. It’s extremely important for people in prison to have the chance to be creative. It boosts morale and helps them realise that they do have potential and can achieve things.”

Read more about Inside Stories

inside stories 2019

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Create wins 17 Koestler Trust awards

Inside Stories
Inside Stories

KOESTLER TRUST RECOGNISES CREATE PARTICIPANTS WITH 17 AWARDS

Radio plays and storybooks made by prisoners as part of our Inside Change and Inside Stories projects have won an incredible 17 Koestler Awards. (This story is from 2018.)

The prizes are awarded by the Koestler Trust, an organisation that awards, exhibits and sells art by prisoners, detainees and secure patients. Since 2012, work made during our projects has been recognised with a total of 81 Koestler Awards. This year is particularly special as, for the first time, one of our award-winning pieces has been selected by the curators of the Koestler Trust exhibition at the Royal Festival Hall.

Of particular note this year are the five accolades for Inside Change. This is a new programme enabling prisoners to explore financial literacy through creating original radio plays. Working with our professional drama artists, prisoners use script writing and drama to develop their financial capability. This aids their rehabilitation and smoother transition back into the community on release. One of the plays, Bars Behind Bars, won the Gold Award in the Radio Play category.

Prisoners use script writing and drama to develop their financial skills. This aids their smoother transition back into the community on release. Government research suggests that low financial literacy is a major barrier to the resettlement of offenders back into communities. Many prisoners and ex-offenders recognise that they have poor money management skills and find it hard to budget. Some reflected that it was hard to learn how to manage money while in prison as everything was provided, so they did not have an opportunity to develop their budgeting skills.

One Inside Change participant told us:

“[Projects] like these make people more aware of financial issues and have the potential to reduce crime by reducing debt. I learnt about high interest loans, to always read the small print, and also about how to stretch money as far as possible and plan my finances.

“Creating the script for the radio play was a new experience – I’d never done a radio play before. The workshops helped me become better at expressing myself and waiting for my turn. As time went on I grew more confident. We all had input and Create’s artists ensured everyone was included. We learnt how to work together and had a laugh recording the play. They’re a good group of boys.

“I’m looking forward to hearing the play on National Prison Radio. It’ll give me bragging rights! I would do this every day. It was the most enjoyable activity I’ve done in prison.

“The workshops helped me become better at expressing myself and waiting for my turn.”

Prisoners produce Koestler-winning illustrated stories for their children

Inside Stories, our programme giving prisoners the opportunity to produce illustrated stories and music for their children, won the remaining 12 awards. Guided by our professional writer, visual artist and musicians, prisoners work in pairs to write, record and illustrate original stories. They then work as a group to set these to music. Following their performance in the prison during a special family visit, the children receive a copy of the professionally produced storybook and CD. This helps to maintain the bond between parent and child.

Below, I’m delighted to share one of the winning stories. Kit Cat the Hero Cat won the First-Time Entrant Award in the Graphic Novel category and the Commended Award in the Flash Fiction and Novel category.

Nicky Goulder, Founding Chief Executive

Create wins three Children and Young People Now awards

children and young people now awards 2017
children and young people now awards 2017

CREATE WINS THREE CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE NOW HIGHLY COMMENDED AWARDS

Last night was a highly emotional and successful one for Create: our work with children and young people was recognised with not one, not two but THREE Children & Young People Now Highly Commended awards.

Our Senior Project Manager Jodie Sadler and I attended the ceremony, an evening that celebrates the work of those working with children, young people and families across the UK. The event was fun – the celebratory tone was set from the start with a vibrant performance by students from the World Heart Beat Music Academy which received rapturous applause – always great to have the arts up front! The evening was compered by TV and radio presenter and Childline Counsellor Anna Williamson.

The Children & Young People Now Awards have become the gold standard for everyone working with children, young people and families. Now in their 12th year, these awards are a great source of pride and recognition for all those who strive to improve the lives of others. They raise the profile of projects and initiatives to funders and the general public, and showcase learning and best practice from across the country. Crucially, entrants must be able to provide evidence that what they have done has had a positive impact on people’s lives.

So what did we win?

The Youth Work Award for ‘the initiative that has done the most to promote young people’s personal development and help them to achieve their potential.’

We were Highly Commended for creative:connection, our programme that brings disabled and non-disabled children and young people together for creative activities, helping to break down barriers and develop shared understanding.

Whitney, 14, who took part in a creative:connection project in Barnet, north London, said: “I didn’t know any disabled people before this project so I wasn’t sure how we’d work together a team. I thought they might struggle with certain things and they proved me wrong. I have a different understanding of disability now. I saw that the disabled students had so much fun being creative and getting stuck into the activities.”

The Young Carers Award for ‘the initiative that has done the most to support children, young people or young adults up to 25 who care for a family member or friend with an illness, disability, mental health problem or addition.’

We were Highly Commended for art:space and inspired:arts, our programmes that give young carers a break from their caring responsibilities and enable them to develop new skills and peer support.

Anthony, 12, who took part in an inspired:arts project in Newham, east London, said: “I wasn’t really a creative person before and I didn’t think much of art but the Create workshops have helped me realise that there are loads of exciting artforms I can explore. Now I’m thinking about taking Art GCSE. Young carers take on a lot and do a lot at home, so it’s really important that every now and then we get together and have a chance to do something that’s just for us. When you spend time with other young carers you can share your problems and experiences with each other, which is really important.”

The Youth Justice Award for ‘the initiative that has made the biggest contribution to improving the life chances of young offenders, or those at risk of offending or reoffending.’

We were Highly Commended for Inside Stories, our programme through which young offenders write, record, illustrate and set to music original stories for their children.

Ryan, who took part in an Inside Stories project, said: “You’ll hear a lot of people in jail saying their kids are their rocks. You can only make two phone calls a week in here and it’s hard to talk to them because, well, there’s not a lot you can say to children while you’re in prison. Having this book that you can give to them, and a CD where they can hear your voice makes you feel good. They can say “that’s my daddy”. It makes me feel good knowing they can hear my voice whenever they want, just by pressing ‘play’ on a CD player.”

We are deeply committed to raising awareness of the empowering qualities of engaging in the creative arts. To have been acknowledged with three Children and Young People Now Highly Commended awards is wonderful recognition of the deep commitment to our work with children and young people shown by our funders, our dedicated staff team and the inspirational professional artists who deliver our programmes.

Nicky Goulder, Founding Chief Executive

This article is from 2017.

Create shortlisted for three Children & Young People Now awards

children and young people now finalist 2017
children and young people now finalist 2017

CREATE SHORTLISTED FOR THREE CHILDREN & YOUNG PEOPLE NOW AWARDS

Everyone at Create is feeling a little overwhelmed this week after we found out we’ve been shortlisted for three (three!) Children & Young People Now awards.

These are the Young Carers Award, the Youth Justice Award and the Youth Work Award. That the awards cover the work with three of our seven key participant groups reflects the high-quality of our workshops across the board. We couldn’t have delivered such well-received projects without the hard work of our staff, artists, community partners, supporters and funders, but most importantly our amazing participants!

The Young Carers Award is for the initiative that has done the most to support children, young people or young adults up to 25 who care for a family member or friend with an illness, disability, mental health problem or addiction. This includes support to meet carers’ educational, health, social and emotional needs; helping carers who have previously been unidentified by services; and working with families to reduce inappropriate levels of caring.

The Youth Justice Award is for the initiative that has made the biggest contribution to improving the life chances of young offenders, or those at risk of offending or reoffending. Entries are invited from local authorities, youth offending teams and youth services, as well as voluntary organisations and individual projects.

The Youth Work Award is for the initiative that has done the most to promote young people’s personal development and help them achieve their potential through youth work, informal education and participation in positive activities, especially among disadvantaged or excluded groups.

Ravi Chandiramani, Editor-in-chief of Children & Young People Now, said: “The Children & Young People Now Awards have become the gold standard for everyone working with children, young people and families. Now in their twelfth year, these awards provide a great source of pride and recognition for all those who strive day in, day out, to improve the lives of others. They offer an opportunity to raise the profile of projects and initiatives to funders and the general public.

“And they present a tremendous showcase of learning and best practice from across the country that can be an inspiration to all. The awards recognise initiatives from the public, private and voluntary sector that work with children and young people from birth to adolescence as well as their families. Initiatives might be aimed at all children and families within a community or targeted at those who are the most vulnerable or disadvantaged. Crucially, entrants must be able to provide evidence that what they have done has had a positive impact on people’s lives.”

The Children & Young People Now Award Ceremony takes place on Wednesday 22 November – we’ll let you know how we get on!

Nicky Goulder, Founding Chief Executive

This article is from 2017.

Erwin James and Inside Stories at the Old Bailey

Erwin James talking in Court No. 1 of the Old Bailey © Julia Quenzler
Erwin James talking in Court No. 1 of the Old Bailey © Julia Quenzler

INSIDE STORIES AT THE OLD BAILEY

I was reminded once again of the importance and impact of Create’s work when we hosted a unique event, Inside Stories at the Old Bailey last month at which author, journalist and Create Patron Erwin James gave an historic and inspirational speech.

It was in Court No. 1 of the Old Bailey that Erwin was handed down a life sentence in 1985. Whilst in prison – he served 20 years to the day – he discovered his passion and talent for writing.

He spoke from the witness stand in Court 1 about the power of the arts to change lives: “When I was sentenced and taken down to the cells below the court I was pretty sure my life was at an end. It had been a difficult and painful life, for me, but more importantly for other people because of me and I was relieved that it was over. I never expected to live again, not in any meaningful way. I certainly never imagined that one day I might be back in the same dock sharing the journey and explaining how I managed to salvage some good from the wreckage that had been my life before prison. I’m not proud of much in my life, but I’ve witnessed the work of Create in prisons and in the community and I’m proud and honoured to be a supporter. Experiencing creativity and the arts in prison helped me to find some value in my life and gave me the confidence to try to find a better way to live.”

Erwin’s speech was moving, powerful and challenged our guests’ perspectives on prisons and offenders. I’d like to say a huge thank you to him for his time, honesty and generosity on what was clearly a hugely emotional occasion.

Inside Stories at the Old Bailey was carefully planned to raise funds for our Inside Stories project, which connects fathers in prison with their children on the outside via storytelling. The evening started with a reception in the spectacular Grand Hall, including an introduction to the Old Bailey from our host, Sheriff Peter Estlin. We then entered Court 1 where His Honour Judge Topolski QC talked about the history and function of the courtroom itself. The significance of this particular court left us in no doubt about how momentous it was for Erwin to speak once again from the witness box.

After our guests had moved to the Judges’ Dining Room Create, novelist and Create writer Carol Topolski read three stories from a special edition of Stories from Daddy to Me – an Inside Stories storybook that had previously been recognised with a Platinum Koestler Award – and shared moving stories the fathers who had written them and their children. Carol subsequently wrote an article about the project for The Observer.

The evening concluded with tours of the Old Bailey, including the cells, generously led by Sherriff Peter Estlin, Lindy Estlin, His Honour Judge Topolski QC and Charles Henty, the Secondary of London and Under Sheriff and High Bailiff of Southwark. We appreciate so much the generosity of our hosts for enabling such an incredible evening, which raised £43,315 net for our work in prison and was described by one of our clients as: “the most remarkable event we can remember at Create”.

Nicky Goulder, Founding Chief Executive

This article is from 2017.

Inside Stories wins 22 Koestler Awards

inside stories 2016
inside stories 2016

INSIDE STORIES WINS 22 KOESTLER AWARDS

Storybooks made by young fathers in prison as part of our Inside Stories project have, for the second year in a row, won a remarkable amount of prizes at the Koestler Awards.

This year our participants’ work has been recognised with 22 Koestler Awards, following the 18 won in 2015, bringing to 60 the total number of awards received since 2012. These prestigious accolades are presented by Koestler Trust, an organisation dedicated to awarding, exhibiting and selling artworks by offenders, detainees and secure patients.

Our Inside Stories programme gives offenders aged 18-25 the opportunity to produce illustrated stories and music for their children. Working under the guidance of our professional writer, visual artist and musicians, they work in pairs to write, record and illustrate original stories before working as a group to set these to music. Following their performance in the prison during a special family visit, the children receive a copy of the professionally produced storybook and CD, helping to maintain the bond between parent and child.

The Ministry of Justice has found that sustaining family ties makes it easier for offenders to reintegrate into society and increases their chance of finding a job and stable accommodation once they are released. One of our participants told us:

“I thought Inside Stories would be a good opportunity to do something to show my family I am thinking about them all the time and being productive with my time in prison. I hope when my girl sees this book it’ll make her think I can be a good dad. I think my family feel proud of me for doing this.

“This project has helped my partner, children and parents feel more relaxed and positive about my time in prison. It helps them think about me being productive, becoming a good man. Maybe in the past I wouldn’t have done something nice like this for my loved ones, so it helps me show them how much I care for them.”

To celebrate these 22 incredible achievements, I am delighted to share The Tiger Who Lost Her Stripes. This was awarded the First Time Entrant award for Spoken Word and Bronze in the Flash Fiction & Short Story category.

I hope you are as inspired as I am.

Nicky Goulder, Founding Chief Executive

inside stories 2016

The Tiger Who Lost Her Stripes

Amelia the litter tiger got ready for her daily walk around her favourite place in the whole world, the zoo she called home.

She walked past the pond and she was struck by her reflection. She looked all around but Amelia’s stripes were nowhere to be found.

Ava the zebra saw sad Amelia. She asked, “What’s wrong?”
“I lost my stripes.”
“Would you like to try on my stripes?”
“Could I?” said Amelia. Amelia tried Ava’s stripes but they didn’t look right.

Alyzah the giraffe saw sad Amelia. She asked, “What’s wrong?”
“I lost my stripes.”
“Would you like to try on my patches?”
“Could I?” said Amelia. Amelia tried Alyzah’s patches but they didn’t look right.

“I’m never gonna find my stripes!” said Amelia.
“Don’t give up,” said Ava.
“We will help you,” said Alyzah.

The bush started to move. Lenny the lion jumped out.
“What you doing hiding?” said Ava.
“Better yet, what you doing with stripes?” said Alyzah.
“Sorry,” said Lenny. “I just wanted to know what it’s like to have something special.”

“You are special, you’re a lion. You’ve got a mane!” said Amelia.
“How about you wear my stripes for the day and I’ll wear your mane?”

They went and played in the wonderful zoo they called home.

18 Koestler Awards for Create’s project with offenders

inside stories 2015
inside stories 2015

18 KOESTLER AWARDS FOR CREATE’S PROJECT WITH OFFENDERS

This year, Inside Stories, our creative project for young parents in prison, was recognised with 18 Koestler Awards.

These prestigious accolades are presented by Koestler Trust, an organisation dedicated to awarding, exhibiting and selling artworks by offenders, detainees and secure patients. This year, the Trust received over 8,500 pieces of writing, music, film, fine art and design from prisons across the country, making the achievements of our participants all the more impressive.

Our Inside Stories programme gives offenders aged 18-25 the opportunity to produce illustrated stories and music for their children. Working under the guidance of our professional writer, visual artist and musicians, they work in pairs to write, record and illustrate original stories before working as a group to set these to music. Following their performance in the prison during a special family visit, the children receive a copy of the professionally produced storybook and CD, helping to maintain the bond between parent and child.

The Ministry of Justice has found that sustaining family ties makes it easier for an offender to reintegrate into society and increases their chance of finding a job and stable accommodation once they are released.

One of our participants told us, “I wanted to do Inside Stories because it’s something that could help me feel close to my children. Because I’m in here, I don’t have as much time as I’d like with them. I thought that if they could hear my voice on the CD, maybe they can hear my voice at night time before they go to bed and know that Daddy’s still thinking about them.”

To celebrate these 18 incredible achievements, we are delighted to share The Hat Snatcher, a story written and illustrated by offenders. This was awarded the Gold Award for Mixed Media.

The Hat Snatcher

There was once a man called Peter who lived in the forest with his little boy Jimmy. Peter owned a hat shop, with hats of all shapes and sizes. Not far from them, there lived a bear called Barry. Jimmy and Barry were friends. One day, Jimmy visited Barry and noticed Barry’s hat collection.

Jimmy said, “Where did you get those hats from?”

Barry replied, “I found them scattered around the forest.”

“My dad has hats like those.”

“Does he want them back?”

“No, it’s fine Barry.”

When Jimmy got home, Peter was really angry because his hats had been stolen.

“Barry found lots of hats around the forest, dad.”

Peter replied, “I’ll teach that bear for stealing my hats!”

That night Jimmy was woken by a loud howl. He looked out of his window and noticed his dad had changed into a big, hairy wolf and had loads of hats in his teeth! He then ran into the forest dropping them everywhere! Peter returned with a hat on his head, he got into bed and little Jimmy said, “You’re the hat snatcher, not Barry! You need to say sorry.”

So off to Barry’s they went and partied into the night. Oh what a great sight!

Meet Matt

inside stories 2015
inside stories 2015

MEET MATT

Inside Stories is Create’s award-winning multi-artform project for offenders aged 18-25 in prisons across England.

During March and April 2015, prisoners worked with Create’s professional writer, visual artist and musicians to write and illustrate their own storybooks accompanied with a CD of music. The project culminated in a special visit day in which the prisoners had the opportunity to share their work with their families.

Matt is a young lifer who took part in the project. Whilst in prison he successfully engaged in numerous offending behaviour programmes and trained in Advice & Guidance, Peer Supervision and IT Course Mentoring. After 11 years in prison, Matt was released a few days after Inside Stories finished.

“the project has taught me how to listen to other people’s ideas and go with them.”

Matt

“When I first heard about this project, I thought we would just be getting together to write a story. It was only when I found out a bit more about the project that I started to look forward to it. I decided to get involved because I wanted to feel connected with my daughter.

“For my story, I came up with Super Susie, because my daughter is called Susie (not her real name). I don’t know where the flying egg character came from! I think I was trying to draw a mouse but the body looked like an egg so I turned it into one. My partner came up the idea to include a vegetarian tiger so we put the two together in the jungle. In the original story, Susie was trying to get home, but obviously that was too long so we had to cut it down. In the end, the tiger was looking for fruit to eat so Susie used her special powers to magic him up some fruit.

“I think the project has taught me how to listen to other people’s ideas and go with them. It’s also taught me how to put across my ideas without sounding too dominating. I don’t usually like talking in front of people, in groups. That was probably the hardest part for me but I surprised myself in that I managed it quite well.

“Projects like Inside Stories are important because you need to keep that family tie while you’re in prison. When the children start getting older and realise that their dad’s away all the time, it’s good for them to have a way to interact and keep that bond going.

“Writing this book has given me new ideas of ways to relate to my daughter. Susie’s only two-and-a-half months old, so I haven’t had much time with her. When she’s older and can understand, hopefully she’ll feel that because I took part in making the book, the book is important to her.”

Inside Stories wins 12 Koestler Awards

inside stories

INSIDE STORIES WINS 12 KOESTLER AWARDS

Our Inside Stories project has been recognised with 12 Koestler Awards (this story is from 2014). These prestigious accolades acknowledge the creative achievements of offenders, secure patients and detainees, providing encouragement, motivation and an outlet for creative energies and emotions.

For the past ten years, we have worked with prisons in London and Kent to provide offenders with access to high quality creative activities. We developed Inside Stories in 2008 to reach out to fathers aged 18-25, enabling them to develop new skills and build positive relationships with their children. Working with our professional artists, they write, record and illustrate their own original stories, which they set to music. The children then receive a professionally-printed storybook with CD.

One of the challenges that prisoners face is the re-adjustment to life outside the prison when they are released. This can influence the likelihood of reoffending. Inside Stories helps to address this by encouraging fathers to bond with their sons and daughters over a creative work that they have had the discipline, concentration and commitment to produce. The offenders gain confidence in their abilities to create something positive and they can focus on being a parent. They also learn skills in storytelling, craft and music that they can share with their children. Ministry of Justice research suggests that maintaining family ties can reduce the risk of re-offending by 39%, so being able to continue this work is highly important.

We’re delighted that the Koestler Awards have recognised the quality of our work in prisons. The inmates work has won 12 awards in four categories: Spoken Text; Anthology; Instrumental Music (a key achievement, as this is a new element of the project); and Mixed Media, with The Royal Family and The Miserable Witch, Stories From Dads To Kids, and Farmyard Party receiving Highly Commended Awards.

Inside Stories means a lot to the children of these prisoners. 1 in 100 children in the EU experience a parent being taken to prison, which can have a devastating impact on their education, relationship with their peer group, and general wellbeing. This project is a way in which these vulnerable children can get to know their parents with the focus being away from their conviction. It’s a way in which these parents can show that they care.

As our Patron Esther Freud wrote in the foreword to one of the books: “To have a story, a poem or a song written for you, inspired by you, event about you, is one of the greatest gifts a child can received. Every child hopes that they are special, and when the children of the young men who wrote these stories – children separated from their fathers by prison – see their names, they will know for certain that they are.”

inspired arts

Nicky Goulder, Chief Executive

Meet Luke

inside stories
inside stories

MEET LUKE

Inside Stories is our creative writing and illustration project for prison inmates. In January 2013, over a two-week period, Create’s professional writer and visual artist helped 16 fathers to write, record and illustrate original stories for their children. Here, Luke, who is currently serving a seven years sentence, talks about his experience. (This piece is from 2013.)

“I decided to do Inside Stories because I thought it would be good for my kids. It’s something personal, and when I did Storybook Dads they loved it. And with this they get to read it and listen to it. I was really pleased and excited when they told me I would be taking part in the project – I’ve never thought to sit and write a book for my kids before! I did art at school, but it’s been a while.

“My story is about a dragon that wakes from his sleep and can smell cakes and sweets. He can hear two princesses having a party, and as he is hungry he decides to go and eat everybody! When he arrives he is met by the 12-legged DJ spider that he is petrified of, so the partying princesses intervene. They all become friends and they eat lots of sweets and party into the night until they fall asleep under the twinkling stars.

“My partner on the project has two daughters so wanted to write about two princesses, and I thought I’d do something slightly different for my children and make them animals instead! Inside Stories has taught me that when you write children’s stories you don’t have to stick to the norm. They can be made to appear differently to what they would normally be perceived as. And for kids you don’t have to cram too much in – you can make the artwork detailed to tell the story.

“Carol [Create’s professional writer] did well in showing us how to break down our stories, to get your idea on paper and edit it down. Getting the initial ideas and developing them into a short story was quite good but probably the hardest part of it. The collage works quite well with the colours. It’s really interesting how you can make that work as opposed to drawing it freehand. The best thing about the project will be when you get your book and give it to your kids so they can take it and read and listen to it. I’m close to my kids anyway and I already read to them. They’ll definitely look at me differently. You’re doing it for them. They’ll love it!

“Projects like Inside Stories are very important in prisons. They create a bridge between you being in here and them being outside. They can read the book over and over again. For some people, it’s good to develop their confidence. I am a peer advisor here, so I tell people what’s on offer. I just tell people to give it a go. From now on, having actually done this project, I can give them more of an insight. I show them the previous books and they can’t believe they will be able to write a story, but I tell them they can!”

To protect anonymity, the name in the case study has been changed. This piece is from 2013.